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    Priesthorpe School in Pudsey supports Blind Veterans UK on Remembrance Day

    This Remembrance season, a wonderful school in Pudsey has paid tribute to all of the men and women who have fallen in conflict, as well as those who are now battling severe sight loss.

    Priesthorpe School launched the ‘Field of Poppies’ two weeks ago in an assembly and the response from the students was incredible. Many donated £2 to have a long stemmed poppy laid on their behalf.

    Poppy wreath

    The school also held a ‘Wear something Red’ day where £1 donations were added to the monies raised from the sale of long stemmed poppies!

    Caretakers from the school cleared a flower bed and the long stemmed poppies were ‘planted’ ready for the 11th November.

    Remembrance Cross

    Their Technology department also took part by cutting wooden crosses, Stars of David, Crescent Moons, Khanda’s and Humanist rectangles which were laid amongst the poppies to represent people of all faiths and beliefs.

    The students really embraced the fundraiser and were excited to be raising money for such a worthwhile cause on the centenary of World War One and supporting the national comemorations.

    A ceremony of remembrance was held on the 11th November at 11am, where representatives from Blind Veterans UK and BLESMA attended and gave their views on life after sight loss.

    Mult-faith crosses

    Andrew who was involved with the display said “I selected the lesser known military charities together in a project that would include the history of the occasion. At the same time showing the importance of encouraging our children, regardless of their ethnic background or religion, to respect the sacrifices of our past by working together for the future. I believe this to be doubly important in a multicultural school such as Priesthorpe.”

    Cheque presentation

    In total the school raised a massive £800 for Blind Veterans UK, which will go towards our vital rehabilitation, training and care for vision impaired ex-Service men and women.

    Field of poppies

    We would like to thank Priesthorpe School for all their creative display, efforts and for the amazing contribtions they have made to the lifes of ex-Service men and women.

    If you know an ex-Service man or woman who could be eligible for our support please visit www.noonealone.org.uk for more information.

    Paul Jacobs BBC Remembrance Poetry

    At the end of the national BBC coverage on Remembrance Sunday, a poem was read out to close the ceremony. It was written by blind veteran Paul Jacobs GM.

    Paul Jacobs GM, served with the 2nd Battalion The Rifles, and was blinded on Afghanistan’s frontline on 20th August 2009. He was awarded the prestigious George Medal for bravery as he continued to protect his colleagues after he was wounded.

    His medal citation read: “His sheer personal courage and startling determination, unswerving courage, selflessness, devotion to duty and dedication to his comrades was faultless.”

    Since leaving Service he has received free support and rehabilitation from Blind Veterans UK and has gone one to write some haunting and brilliant poetry about his experiences. Here is one of his poems which was read out on Remembrance Sunday.

     

    Fallen Saints by Paul Jacobs GM

     

    As I walk through the gates of hell on Devil’s Road

    I look down this lonely dusty track where so many lives have changed

    Physically or mentally the damage is done

    You cannot turn back the hands of time

    But life goes on as the length of Pharmacy Road never ceases to end

    Like the desert breeze that took these men from me

    Their spirits and souls flow across the sea back to Blighty where the country will salute them

    And where the men who stood beside them will cry a tear and never forget

    R.I.P my brothers

    Paul Jacobs

    Paul Jacobs

    If you would like to hear more of Paul’s brilliant poetry click here.

    There are over 68,000 vision impaired veterans who could be eligible for support, but are not currently receiving it. Request our free, lifelong support for a blind veteran by calling 0800 389 7979 or visiting www.noonealone.org.uk

    Ex-soldier blinded in Kenya to remember astonishing reunion with former enemy when he represents Blind Veterans UK on Remembrance Sunday

    In an astonishing tale, former soldier who was blinded and nearly killed in the Mau Mau Uprising in Kenya 60 years ago recalls his chance meeting with his former enemy.

    84 year old Mike Tetley MBE, grew up in Nairobi in Kenya, and was called up for National Service in 1953 after earlier training as a structural engineer.

    Mike Tetley

    Mike Tetley

    Mike, who speaks fluent Swahili, joined the Kenya Regiment and was then sent to the King’s African Rifles where he fought in the Mau Mau Uprising to fight a rebellion of Kikuyu independence fighters.

    Mike recalls losing his sight

    Mike lost his sight after being shot while in action. His unit had intercepted a gang which had ambushed a police pay truck and he was involved in heavy fighting.

    Mike says “It was the first time I’d let off a submachine gun magazine using all the bullets, which left me feeling completely defenceless.

    During the fighting, a bullet hit me in the left ear and came out of my right eye. As I lay on the ground a Kenyan fellow-soldier stood over me and single-handedly fought off seven enemy soldiers. I was lucky to escape with my life.”

    Mike returns to the site he was shot and is guided by a former terrorist

    Mike says “20 years after I was blinded I went back to the Tree Tops Hotel in Kenya with my children and asked a game ranger to guide us through the forest so that my kids could have a better feel of the place where it all happened.

    I was guided by a former terrorist called General Chui, who had a gun and guided me through the forest showing me where their hideouts had been.

    “At the end of the walk I invited him for a cup of coffee and asked him about that time. To my surprise he said ‘I know you because you shot me in my leg and it was one of my soldiers that blinded you.’

    He showed me his leg where I had shot him, and we talked at length and he said ‘We must not hate each other because hate destroys us from within’.”

    Speaking about the realisation that he had become blind, Mike says “I didn’t really know anyone who was blind before becoming blind myself. I remember seeing a man once in Durban who was blind, sitting in the rain selling shoelaces. When I became injured I couldn’t help but wonder, ‘What kind of life have I got now?’”

    Life after sight loss

    Following his medical discharge from the Army, Mike contacted Blind Veterans UK and discovered he was eligible to receive free support and training.

    At Blind Veterans UK he trained as a physiotherapist, something Mike has now been doing professionally for nearly 60 years.

    He says “Without Blind Veterans UK, I’m not sure what I would have done for a living. They offered me training so I could still be self-sufficient with sight loss. Now, thanks to Blind Veterans UK, I have a practice which still treats a large number of new patients each year.”

    Marching on Remembrance Sunday

    Mike will join around 100 other vision impaired ex-Service men and women supported by Blind Veterans UK on the annual Remembrance Sunday march at The Cenotaph in London.

    Mike says on Remembrance Sunday he will be thinking about his experiences, and all those who serve. He says “We saw action every single day for six months, but I still think my service was a picnic compared to those who’ve been in Afghanistan.

    Most of our fighting was close-quarters and we didn’t have improvised explosive devices or roadside bombs to compete with.”

    On Remembrance Sunday, when I march with other veterans for Blind Veterans UK, I will also be remembering General Chui, and how my enemy then became my friend.”

    If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    If you liked reading this blog post you might also like to read:  Falklands former Royal Navy veteran blinded by a cannon shell is to take part in Remembrance Sunday with Blind Veterans UK.

    Falklands former Royal Navy veteran blinded by a cannon shell is to take part in Remembrance Sunday for Blind Veterans UK

    70 year old Terry Bullingham first joined the Royal Navy in 1960 where he became part of Fleet Air Arm branch. Whilst he was serving on the HMS Antrim in the Falklands he was hit by a cannon shell from an attacking Mirage Jet, which left him totally blind.

    In 1982 Terry was referred to Blind Veterans UK where he received free support, including rehabilitation and training at our centre in Brighton.

    Terry Bullingham

    Terry Bullingham

    Terry says: “When you first lose your sight it’s like being taken back into infancy; you can’t get around, and you lose literacy. You literally have to go back to basics. However, I was inspired by the blind World War One and Two veterans I met at Blind Veterans UK.

    I thought, if you can crack it, I’m certainly going to! They had overcome such challenges in their lives, and yet not one of them felt any self pity. The camaraderie together with the encouragement and support from Blind Veterans UK kept me positive and I found I was able to achieve more each day.”

    After Terry completed his rehabilitation and training, he returned to the Royal Navy as an Information Officer at the Fleet Air Arm Museum, RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset. He later retired from the Royal Navy and went on to become a Social Worker and Technical Officer for the blind.

    Terry himself became an inspiration to others, by becoming a speaker for Blind Veterans UK and gave talks to groups about his experiences.

    He says: “Whilst at Blind Veterans UK I learnt about the three A’s – acceptance, adjustment and achievement. I wanted to share my experiences of this wonderful charity and their commitment to so many providing lifelong support.”

    Terry takes part in the Remembrance Sunday March

    On Remembrance Sunday Terry will be taking part in the march with Blind Veterans UK. He said: “It is a privilege to be part of Remembrance Sunday. I have attended over 20 Remembrance Sundays and I will again be a part of it this year with my guide, ex-Navy Lieutenant Commander Tim Smart.

    I try to remember all those who lost their lives and suffered from both World Wars and other conflicts. On the parade itself I think of the 253 who perished during the Falklands War and during the silence I remember in particular former Fleet Air Arm friends and colleagues who failed to return, and their surviving families.”

    For more information about the support Blind Veterans UK can provide to vision impaired ex-Service men and women, please visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

    If you liked reading this blog you might also like to read: An ex-Soldier who lost his sight in an accident while on active Service is set to march to the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday

    An ex-soldier who lost his sight in an accident while on active service is set to march to the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday.

    Carl Adamson, who served in the Cheshire Regiment between 1995 and 2000, lost his sight in Northern Ireland, when the armoured Land Rover he and his team were driving in overturned.

    Carl Adamson

    Carl Adamson

    Carl, who only had a week left of his tour, was thrown from the vehicle, which pinned him down and crushed his head as it tumbled to the ground. He says “No one knew I was under the Rover, so when they got out and stood on top to get out of the vehicle that actually made it worse.

    “I was convinced I was going to die. When they got me out, I could feel my head physically sinking inwards and it was very touch or go as to whether I was going to make it.”

    Carl woke up in a hospital shortly after and realised that the accident had robbed him of his sight. He says “I could vaguely see a white light if I looked in the right direction, but my bone structure had completely changed and put pressure on my eyes.”

    Carl Adamson receives 14 operations and is provided free support by Blind Veterans UK

    Carl has had 14 operations to reconstruct his face and is now supported by Blind Veterans UK and to help him live independently with sight loss. He says “It’s been a difficult journey so far and it’s not over yet, but without Blind Veterans UK, I wouldn’t be where I am now.

    “Blind Veterans UK has shown me all the things I can do without my sight, from kayaking and archery to using a computer – even if I can’t see the screen.”

    Carl joins the Remembrance march

    On Remembrance Sunday Carl will be one of the thousands of Armed Forces veterans taking part in the national commemorations at the Cenotaph in London and he will be representing Blind Veterans UK.

    He says “It’s a huge honour to represent Blind Veterans UK and the veterans’ community on the march. The Army wasn’t an easy life, but it was incredibly rewarding and I’m very proud to have served. I knew the risks when I joined, but I wanted to serve.

    “I’ve done tours of the battlefields in northern France, so I understand what millions of people gave up for our freedom and safety in the world wars and since then. Remembrance Sunday is an incredibly moving occasion and one where we should remember all those who have made sacrifices for us.”

    More than 68,000 other veterans could be eligible for free help and support without realising it. If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    If you liked this blog post you might also like to read: Visually imapired veteran from the Merchant Navy from WWII to march with Blind Veterans UK this Sunday 

    Visually impaired veteran from the Merchant Navy Veteran from WWII to march with Blind Veterans UK this Sunday

    88 year old Derek Stead joined the Merchant Navy in 1942, when he was just 16. He says “I was a young man and was fed up with all the blackouts and air raids, so I decided to join the Forces and get out there.

    “The Merchant Navy was the only one I was able to join, but it wasn’t an easy option; the Merchant Service had the highest percentage of casualties of all the Services, so it was hugely dangerous.”

    Derek helped British forces transport vital food, supplies and arms from across the world, despite dangerous German blockades. He says “We were doing everything from bringing weapons from America and transporting troops from Sri Lanka to picking up consignments of peanuts from West Africa.”

    Derek Stead

    As well as the vital work of carrying supplies for the war effort, the Merchant Navy was also involved in many of the troop landings in the Mediterranean.

    Derek says “The ship I was on helped transport the 8th Army from their campaign in North Africa to the invasion of Sicily. The worst part of the landings was always the bit beforehand. No one was allowed to smoke or talk and it was incredibly tense.

    “We would arrive at Palermo beach and instantly there’d be gunfire, rockets and goodness knows what else. At times I never thought I’d see another sunset.”

    “A few months after that, I was stationed at the Suez Canal and we had a midnight service on Christmas Eve which was one of the most memorable parts of my service. Everyone was dressed in white; we sang English Christmas carols and ate mince pies. To go from the death and destruction we saw in the Mediterranean to that calm, quiet moment was really quite something.”

    When Derek began to lose his sight

    Almost 60 years after leaving the Merchant Navy, Derek began to have difficulties with his sight.

    He says “I was coming back from holiday and noticed that I was struggling to see some of the road signs. I went to my opticians and I was diagnosed as severely vision impaired. They found that a blood vessel at the back of my eye had leaked and it was making my sight blurry. Within six weeks, I was registered blind.

    “My family helped me a huge amount in those first few weeks. My daughter would drive me to the shops rather than letting me walk or get the bus, but I realised that that wasn’t how I wanted my life to be. I wanted to be able to do things myself and stay independent.”

    Since 2008, Derek has received free support from Blind Veterans UK to help him live independently with sight loss; he has received free magnifiers to help him read, as well as talking kitchen gadgets to help him cook without his sight.

    Derek will be one of the vision impaired ex-Service men and women representing Blind Veterans UK at the Remembrance Sunday march to the Cenotaph.

    Derek says “We all ought to remember those who made sacrifices. I was extremely lucky to make it back home after the War. Remembrance Sunday is always very emotional – the crowds are there clapping and cheering. It’s a great honour to represent Blind Veterans UK on the march.”

    If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    If you liked this blog you might also like: Blind archery 5 time champion marches on Remembrance Sunday with Blind Veterans UK

    Blind archery 5 time champion marches on Remembrance Sunday with Blind Veterans UK

    Former European and British blind archery champion and ex-soldier will be taking part in the Remembrance Sunday march at the Cenotaph in London where he will be representing Blind Veterans UK.

    Steve Moseley

    Steve Moseley

    Steve talks about his Service career

    52 year old Steve Moseley worked in the Army from 1978 to 1986 where he worked as a supplier controller/clerk with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps stationed in Germany.

    Shortly after leaving the Army, he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa and his eyesight gradually deteriorated over the years until he was registered blind in 1994.

    Steve says “I really struggled at first with losing my sight, until I discovered Blind Veterans UK and the support they could offer me.”

    Discovering a talent for archery

    Steve has received free support from Blind Veterans UK since 1995 and this has helped him and his family adjust to life with sight loss as well as help reveal his hidden talent for archery.

    “When I visited the charity’s Brighton centre in 2000 for a holiday with my family I was introduced to archery, and discovered that I had quite a talent.”

    Steve went on to be the British Blind Sports Outdoor and Indoor champion five years in a row from 2001 to 2006. He was also European champion of the International Blind Sports Association (IBSA) in 2005, and was number one in the world in 2007 before retiring in 2009.

    He says “It was an amazing time, and all thanks to Blind Veterans UK for helping me discover just what I could achieve.”

    Marching on Remembrance

    On Sunday 9 November, Steve will be one of the veterans supported by Blind Veterans UK who will take part in the national Remembrance Sunday commemorations at the Cenotaph in London.

    Steve says “This is the fourteenth time that I’ll be marching at the Cenotaph and I feel very honoured to be taking part with Blind Veterans UK. It’s such a special and important day and as well as remembering my two grandfathers, I’ll also be remembering the friends I lost whilst stationed in Germany.

    If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    If you liked this article you might also like: Blind Royal Navy and Royal Marines ex-Service man takes part in Remembrance Sunday

    Blind Royal Navy and Royal Marines ex-Service man takes part in Remembrance Sunday

    Ex-Service man Gerry Jackson, who lost his sight over 15 years ago, will be remembering friends and family killed in action when he takes part in the Remembrance Sunday march at the Cenotaph. He will be taking part in the annual commemorations with Blind Veterans UK.

     

    Gerry Jackson

    Gerry Jackson

    Gerry started out in the Royal Navy in 1955 and was in the Fleet Air Arm and he also spent time serving as a Royal Navy Commando with the Royal Marines.

    During his time in Service he specialised in electronics and was stationed around the world including Cyprus, Borneo, Brunei and the Falkland Islands before he was discharged in 1982.

    Gerry says “I had a great time in the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, getting the opportunity to see the world as well as learn a trade, so that when my military career came to an end, I found work in electronics. But one of my best memories is the comradeship that I experienced during my service.”

     

    Gerry’s life turns around after receiving support from Blind Veterans UK

     

    Later on he started to lose his sight from bilateral macular oedema, which causes loss of central vision.

    He recalls “After losing my sight I felt my only option was to sit and do nothing. But a social worker trainee mentioned Blind Veterans UK to me and I’ve been able to turn my life around with their support.”

    Since 2001 Gerry has received free support from Blind Veterans UK to help him and his family adjust to life with sight loss.

    He says “Blind Veterans UK has provided me with a computer system so that I can now access the world! I speak to my brother in New Zealand and my other brother in Switzerland on a regular basis. Blind Veterans UK has also provided me with mobility training, and I go to their Brighton Centre every week to use the gym and pool, and have even given other veterans and public organisations tours of the centre.

    “I’ve rediscovered the comradeship I enjoyed in the Services through the support I’ve received from Blind Veterans UK. In 1959, I was stationed at Lee-on-Solent, with the Fleet Air Arm Field Gun Crew, and I remember Blind Veterans UK, then known as St Dunstan’s, holding annual camps for blind veterans. Who would have thought that 55 years later I would be one of the veterans who now attends these camps.”

     

    Gerry on marching to the Cenotaph

     

    On Sunday 9 November, Gerry will be one of more than 100 vision-impaired veterans supported by Blind Veterans UK who will take part in the national Remembrance Sunday commemorations at the Cenotaph in London.

    He says “This will be the eighth time that I’ve marched at the Cenotaph. It’s so important to me that we all should remember those who’ve given their lives in service for our country. Whilst I have difficulty seeing the crowds, I can hear their clapping as we march with the Blind Veterans UK contingent and it’s very moving to hear the support.”

     

    Help us reach out to more veterans like Gerry

     

    Blind Veterans UK’s campaign No One Alone aims to reach out to more veterans like Gerry. More than 68,000 other veterans could be eligible for free help and support without realising it. If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    For more information about Blind Veterans UK’s work, please visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

    95-year old blind WWII ex-soldier to march on Remembrance Sunday with Blind Veterans UK

    95-year-old World War II veteran will be joining 100 other vision impaired veterans on the Remembrance march to the Cenotaph this November.

    Bill Braund pictured below will be representing Blind Veterans UK on the march.

    Bill Braund

     

     

    Despite being blinded in one eye after an accident as a child, Bill served in the Welsh Regiment for the entirety of World War II and rose to the rank of Sergeant Major. Bill says:

    “The Army was hard-going, especially the training, but it was one of those things that we just took in our stride – there was a war on, so we had to serve.”

    During his time in the Army, Bill served in Sudan, Malawi and Burma, spending five years in the King’s African Rifles.

    Bill says “We didn’t see much action in Africa, but Burma was very difficult. We arrived in monsoon season, and it would take us a week to travel 26 miles because the roads were impassable.

    As a Welshman, I thought I’d seen a lot of rain, but that was nothing compared to Burma.”

    Life after the War

    In 1946 Bill was discharged from the Army and returned to the Rhonda Valley, where he played as a goalkeeper for Cardiff City FC as well as being a tram driver in the city.

    6 decades after leaving the Army, Bill began to struggle with the sight in his good eye and was later diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration in his remaining eye, meaning that he was registered blind in 2008.

    Now Bill is receiving free and comprehensive support from Blind Veterans UK to help him live independently with his sight loss. He says about joining us:

    “Blind Veterans UK has brought me back into the world. I used to be very negative about my sight loss, but meeting other veterans in a similar situation has really helped me find the positives.

    “Blind Veterans UK has also given me various gadgets to help me make the most of the sight I still have.”

    Remembrance March

    On Sunday 9 November, Bill will be one of the thousands of veterans taking part in the national Remembrance Sunday march in London. Bill, who has marched 4 times previously, will be completing the march with Blind Veterans UK in a wheelchair.

    What Remembrance means to Bill:

    “Remembrance Sunday means a lot to me personally; particularly when I think of the friends I lost in World War II. I had one very good friend who drowned in Burma when we were crossing a rope bridge. He was swept away by the current and his body was never found. I’ll be thinking about him, and all those who’ve died in service, during the two minutes’ silence.”

    Help us reach more veterans like Bill

    Blind Veterans UK’s campaign No One Alone aims to reach out to more veterans like Bill. More than 68,000 other veterans could be eligible for free help and support without realising it.

    If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.

    For more information about Blind Veterans UK’s work, please visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

    91-year-old World War II WREN is taking part in the Remembrance March for Blind Veterans UK

    91-year-old inspirational great-great-grandmother who served in WW2 will be representing Blind Veterans UK for the second time in the Remembrance Sunday March.

     

    Audrey Brooks

    Audrey Brooks

     

    Audrey Brooks, who served in the Royal Navy, said that the march and representing Blind Veterans UK “means an awful lot” to her. “I’ve done pretty well to take part in the march at my age!

    “Most of my family have served at one time or another and so we understand just how important Remembrance Sunday is – my brother was in the Navy at the same time as me, my granddaughter was in the Army for three years and my great-granddaughter is married to a man in the RAF who’s served in Afghanistan.”

    Audrey served in the Women’s Royal Naval Service – also known as the Wrens’ – from 1943 until the end of the War.

    Audrey tells us more about her time in the service

    She really wanted to sign up aged 17, but was asked not to by her older brother, who was then serving in the Navy. Audrey says: “It was just my mother, my brother and me, and we didn’t want to leave my mother alone in London. Then I got the call up aged 19 and joined.

    “Like most people at that time, I wanted to serve my country but I also wanted to have something of an adventure. My brother didn’t think I’d pass the exams or cope with the discipline, but I got through and loved every minute of it.

    “I was hoping to get an exotic assignment – Cairo, Alexandria or somewhere like that – but I was stationed in London, helping to ship other Wrens to and from the UK.”

    While Audrey’s deployment may not have been the adventure she was hoping for, it was not without danger – her work meant that she often had to cross London during the Blitz.

    Audrey says: “We were meant to throw ourselves to the ground if we heard one of the doodlebug flying bombs above us. There was one time where I hit my head against someone else’s and when we got up, I saw it was a superior officer. He just said, ‘Good morning, my dear’, I said, ‘Good morning, sir’, and we walked off. It was a strange thing to happen suddenly in St James’ Park.”

    When Audrey started to lose her sight

    For the last 14 years, Audrey has suffered from age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma and is now registered blind. Since joining us in 2003, she has received free and comprehensive support to help her live independently with sight loss.

    Audrey says: “Blind Veterans UK have given me fantastic support and helped me to do things I never thought possible. At the age of 80, they were training me to use a computer without my sight so I can email my granddaughter in Australia.

    “I really doubted that I’d be able to use a computer at my age, but the instructors convinced me that a blind person can do anything they set their mind to.”

    Audrey is looking forward to the Remembrance march and said this about it:

    “The atmosphere on Remembrance Sunday is always absolutely amazing. The applause Blind Veterans UK’s contingent received from the crowd last year was wonderful, but it’s the quiet moments I remember most of all.
    “During the two minutes’ silence, all you can hear – right in the middle of London – is the rustling of the trees and birdsong. It’s such a fitting tribute to those who have served and sacrificed for our country.”

    Help us reach out to more blind veterans like Audrey

    Blind Veterans UK’s campaign No One Alone aims to reach out to more people like Audrey. More than 68,000 other people could be eligible for free help and support without realising it. If you know someone who served in the Armed Forces or National Service who now suffers with sight loss from any reason visit  www.noonealone.org.uk or call 0800 389 7979.